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Asia

Asia in the World (Video Interview with Dr. Yves Tiberghien)

November 1, 2012 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #186 (Video) – Europeans, particularly the French are terrified about the rise of China. This is the first book that presents China not as an ugly, totalitarian, and repressive state, but as a multifaceted player. China is fragmented and pluralistic and can offer a diverse portfolio to the world. It is a partner that can engage in social and collaborative processes like the G20. […]

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Canada

Interview with Ezra Vogel on Deng Xiaoping’s Role in International Relations (Part 3/3)

November 24, 2011 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #123 – In this final instalment of our interview with Ezra Vogel, he turns first to the legacy of Deng Xiaoping. While Deng’s role in the suppression of popular protest at Tiananmen Square in 1989 will never be forgotten, the longer view will dwell on Deng as the man who changed China and steered the transformation that formed the China we see today. Professor Vogel then turns to Deng’s role in international relations, beginning with the predominant relationship with the US but also noting Canada’s special role in the 1970s and enduring relationship. Finally, Professor Vogel reflects on how he came to write this biography, and much of his public work, in a style that combines scholarship and accessibility. […]

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China

Interview with Ezra Vogel on Deng Xiaoping and Chinese Politics (Part 2/3)

November 17, 2011 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #121 – In part two of our interview with Ezra Vogel, he discusses the domestic politics of Deng’s career. Professor Vogel outlines the forces that shaped Deng as a leader, from his experiences with senior Chinese communists in Europe in the 1920s to Deng’s own “years in the wilderness” in the Cultural Revolution. Loyalty for Deng Xiaoping was based on comradeship over personal friendship – his primary loyalty was to the movement and to its supreme leader, Mao Zedong. […]

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China

Interview with Ezra Vogel on Writing Deng Xiaoping’s Biography (Part 1/3)

November 10, 2011 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #119 – Ezra Vogel is a commanding figure in scholarship on East Asia and American-East Asian relations. His major books include Canton Under Communism, Japan as Number One, and Living with China. Henry Ford II Research Professor of the Social Sciences, Emeritus at Harvard University, he has published a monumental biography, Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China. […]

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China

Chinese Artist/Activist Ai Weiwei Detained

April 7, 2011 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #71 – Famous artist, tweeter, and critic of the Chinese authorities Ai Weiwei (艾未未) disappeared on April 3rd, 2011. This marks the latest in a series of arrests and detentions of human rights activists, bloggers, and lawyers in the Chinese government’s crackdown in response to fears of a jasmine revolution in China. Yet rather than having links to a ‘colour’ revolution, it is Ai’s self-assigned role as memory-keeper for the child victims of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake and obsessive recorder of state-sanctioned acts of violence and surveillance that has led to his detention. Ai Weiwei has taken on the time-honoured task of Confucian historian, allocating praise or blame or imperial censor critiquing a ruler’s shortcomings. His is a modern take on ancient roles: documenting abuses and criticizing injustices by using the internet and social media. […]

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China

Is China the Next Domino?

February 25, 2011 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #59 (Part 2) – Authoritarian regimes seem to be crumbling almost daily. Will China go the way of Middle Eastern dictatorships?

The similarities are obvious. China relies on harsh measures to put down calls for democratic reform. And it is plagued by a huge gap between rich and poor, rampant corruption, rising prices of basic food stuffs, and high unemployment among recent university graduates. […]

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China

Comparing Tahrir Square Demonstrations of 2011 and Tiananmen Protests of 1989

February 24, 2011 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #59 (Part 1) – At first glance there are many similarities: huge crowds (including many young people) demonstrate peacefully in the main square of the capital city against a repressive government that has been in power for a long time; the crowd has no clearly defined leaders; and the military allows the demonstrations to continue over an extended period of time. […]

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China

Hu Jintao’s Promise to Business: Can He Deliver?

February 3, 2011 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #53 – Two weeks ago, fourteen of the world’s most powerful CEOs converged on Washington for a brief 45 minute opportunity to engage Chinese President Hu Jintao (Google was noticeably absent). Of the many issues raised, one has been China’s renewed commitment to the protection of U.S. corporate interests in the Mainland. President Hu voiced support for reform, opening-up, transparency, as well as a fair and just investment climate. Hu then highlighted intellectual property (IP) and government procurement as areas where foreign firms have equal treatment to their Chinese counterparts. […]

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China

Conditions in Tibet Since 2008

November 26, 2010 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #41 – In this interview, Dr. Robert J. Barnett, Director of the Modern Tibetan Studies Program at Columbia University, assesses the importance of the International Association of Tibetan Studies (IATS). The IATS brings together international scholars and scholars from within Tibet and China. In August 2010, Dr. Barnett was a participant of the 12th Seminar of the IATS, which was hosted by the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia. […]

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China

Interview with Dai Qing, the Environmental Activist, Investigative Journalist, and Writer

November 19, 2010 Asia Pacific Memo 0

Memo #39 – The indomitable Dai Qing (戴晴) has chosen to demand answers to uncomfortable questions and bring to account a system that dreams big dreams but harms those it is meant to serve. Ms. Dai is perhaps best known for her active opposition to the Three Gorges Dam project, which led to her imprisonment for ten months in 1989. Her new work with her long-term partners Toronto-based environmental NGO Probe International is an oral history of Beijing residents’ responses to their city’s water crisis. Rapid development has drastically reduced the capital’s water supply and sparked a massive new project to divert (highly polluted) water from the south to the north. This project would displace several hundred thousand people en route and promises to be at least as problematic and disruptive as the Three Gorges Dam. […]

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